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    She has been adamant that she will retire from judo competition after these Olympics. While she has not yet confirmed what her next move will be, it doesn't appear that there will be a shortage of options.

    As for Aguiar, she bounced back from her loss to Tcheumeo to win a Bronze Medal Match for the second straight Olympics.

    The other bronze went to Slovenia's Anamari Velensek, who used a chokehold to take out her opponent. Women's 78kg results Gold: Lukas Krpalek of the Czech Republic took the gold medal in the men's kg division after scoring an ippon on top-seeded Elmar Gasimov of Azerbaijan with 25 seconds left.

    Both judoka previously lost in the quarterfinals of the London Olympics. Ryunosuke Haga gave Japan its seventh bronze medal and 10th total medal in judo at these Olympics.

    The other bronze medal went to Cyrille Maret of France. Men's kg results Gold: Three weeks to go. Two weeks of two-a-day judos and five sessions with my strength coach and his infamous circuits.

    Sleeping in my own bed helps, but only a little. In the middle of the week, my two Olympic teammates, Marti and Angie, and I head to the mall for some much needed time away from training.

    We have a send off party on Saturday to go to, and we all decided all white dresses were the way to go. It hurts to walk around the mall, but it also feels nice to be doing something normal for a few hours in the day.

    Right away, Marti finds a cute sleeveless shirt dress that fits her perfectly. Angie, being the pickier of the three, is going to take some more convincing.

    As we shop, I also find a dress. It is sleeveless and knee length. The back is open with a sheer V in the front.

    Its white, shiny material will work perfectly with some gold shoes I have at home. The rest of the week goes smoothly.

    We train hard , and many nights I am in tears. Most people think I am crying because I want it to be over, but really the tears are of frustration.

    I want to be better. A saying always pops in my mind during these times: Trying to finish the circuit in 10 minutes usually leaves me depleted and more often than not being sick in the bathroom.

    Today is no different, but I finish my last circuit in nine minutes and 35 seconds. After Paul's, I head to the hair salon for some much needed pampering.

    My coach's sister Tanya has been doing my hair for years, and she insists on doing a little more today for the party. She creates an elaborate up-do that leaves me feeling like a princess.

    Tonight is special, and I feel every ounce of the anticipation that has been slowly building for four years. Once back at home, Marti and I get ready.

    At the send-off, the room is packed. So many people have come out to wish our team good luck, and it is so heartwarming for me.

    Kids running around getting their belts signed with dreams of one day being Olympians. Old timers who have been a part of judo for years come to wish us well and show their support.

    The Olympians sit at a table in the front of the room and halfway through, Jimmy gets up to introduce us all.

    Angie, a first time Olympian who has fought tooth and nail to get here. Colton, another first-time Olympian who has so much promise.

    Travis, three-time Olympian and my longtime teammate who I know is going to shine in Rio. Marti, my partner-in-crime and best friend. Bronze in London, but I know she will be golden in Rio.

    Sensei starts rattling off my accolades, and a smile creeps on my face. I join my teammates in standing in front of everyone, and the whole rooms stands to applaud and wish us well.

    Rio here we come. During training the night before I came down on the top of that knee in order to block being thrown.

    I can already see the blood pooling under the skin at the bottom of that knee. Rolling out of my bunk-bed I am immediately reminded of the serious bone bruise on my left shin as soon as my foot grazes the cold ground.

    I realize that even a strong breeze on the surface of that shin will cause searing pain. Walking to the bathroom I gingerly try to wake my body up.

    I have never been hit by a car but I always imagine that this is how it must feel the next day. Every movement of my body requires conscious effort in order to avoid moving too fast and feeling my muscles groan in protest.

    I flick on the bathroom light and groan while I try to unscrew the toothpaste cap with my sore and arthritic fingers.

    I feel like an old woman! As soon as the thought enters my mind I push it away. The Olympics are 50 days away according to my daily check and no amount of soreness or nagging injuries can deter me from my goal.

    I am in Perpignan, France for an elite Olympic training camp with some of the best female judo players in the world. Myself and my other USA Judo teammates have been here for a week and today is our last day.

    We flew to Croatia for another week of training with other Olympians who, much like ourselves, are pining after a Judo Olympic gold medal in Rio.

    From Croatia we head to Budapest for a Grand Prix. It may seem like complaining, listing all my aches and pains and injuries. But for me it is a comforting reality of my sport.

    I know my fingers hurt because I refused to let go of my opponent when she wanted me to, my knee hurts because I refused to be thrown, and my shin hurts because I tried an attack in training that failed.

    I may hurt the next day but in the end I am proud of this pain because I earned it, the same way I will have earned my Olympic medal by having gone through it all.

    When I set the goal to go to the Olympics one day I never wanted anything but gold. Walking away with a bronze medal was thrilling and I am very proud of my performance but in the same way that living on nothing but water and tofu can leave one feeling unsatisfied, there is still a desperate longing for more.

    I have been to Rio before, more times than I can count actually. I fondly remember making it to the final of the World Championships there in I tragically remember the despair after losing that fight in under thirty seconds, to a Brazilian, in front of a Brazilian crowd yeah, imagine that for a second.

    But I prefer the latter when it comes to getting focused. The pain of coming so close to achieving everything you have worked so hard and sacrificed for only to fail is staggering.

    There is no one to blame but yourself. I actually fear that feeling. I will face that Brazilian crowd again on August 8th when I return to the Olympics for the second time, and I may very well be facing a Brazilian again.

    Will I be ready? Everything I am going through now will ensure that. Doors open at 6: The show will also feature live performances by indie pop band and Warner Bros.

    Pre-sale tickets for the show go on sale July 25th at Group discounts are available. The gymnastics cast will be announced following the summer Olympics in Rio.

    In addition, an Olympic dream team will host the show in Amherst and includes: Brittany is a sports enthusiast with a passion for promotion who helps handle digital marketing for Disson Skating.

    She can be contacted at evans. Middle of Nowhere Judoka Training Camp. Before I even open my eyes, my mind is already churning.

    So many thoughts are running through my head. Rio is always first. Am I going to survive this final trip to Europe?

    A hand that is a little tingly and bruised. Why do I put myself and my body through this? It may seem bizarre to most, but my entire life has been spent with one purpose in mind.

    I had more to give. The road is almost at an end, but I know this last bit will be the hardest. Peanut butter, oatmeal, a banana, and some much-needed coffee are in front of me.

    My teammates and I have gone to the grocery store to get the essentials for an in-room breakfast. We are just too tired to make the walk to the dining hall every morning before training.

    We are saving our energy for the wars ahead. I tape my hand and shoulder. I put on my knee pad and get in a good stretch. We do the traditional bow in and then get right into it.

    Two hours later, I am drenched in sweat and my legs feel like they might fall off. I have survived another workout. I have made gains.

    Big Jim, my coach, and I go over some gripping sequences and discuss slight adjustments that need to be made in my game.

    He seems pleased with where I am, and I am relieved. I just keep telling myself that this is it. This is all for Rio. We head back to the room and grab showers before limping our way to lunch.

    I fuel up good. Anything I can get my hands on to try and reenergize myself. There is still one workout to go — well, one more to go today.

    We have one more training camp after this in Croatia. Then we head to the last tournament before the games in Hungary. My mind is right.

    My body is not working now, but I know that it will be on the day that counts. The road to Rio is long, but I know deep down that it will all be worth it.

    There is a book to be written about Andy Murray's relationship with Ivan Lendl. It wouldn't be found in the sports section, though.

    Psychology, maybe; or Personal Growth. Lendl is as much Murray's counsellor as his coach. He doesn't teach tennis; he teaches victory.

    Murray doesn't need a tennis lesson. He's won three Grand Slams. He can play tennis. There are some, good judges too, who maintain he is technically the best tennis player in the world.

    He just doesn't get the results to prove it. He has stopped beating Novak Djokovic in the big finals.

    He takes the odd set from him, but not the match. Yet those sets, those glimmers of hope, prove he could do more. The wins at the US Open and Wimbledon prove he could do more.

    And that is why he turned again to Lendl. Not in Murray's game; in his mind. The often steely-faced Ivan Lendl showed some emotion after Murray's victory, and even looked a little teary.

    Jamie Delgado left , Murray and Lendl speak during a practice session on day 10 of Wimbledon last week. They are on the point of agreeing a new working arrangement, 20 weeks per calendar year.

    Lendl will be with Murray in the build-up to each Slam, and through the tournament. He will commit to a couple of training blocks and two other big competitions as yet unspecified.

    The structure is confirmation that Murray does not need a tutor as much as a mentor; he needs direction, more than instruction.

    Murray's only Grand Slam final wins over Djokovic came when Lendl was his coach the first time, and it is this strategic and psychological supremacy that the pair are hoping to recreate.

    The sight of Djokovic as good as surrendering in the fifth set at the US Open seems frankly incredible to those who have witnessed his physical and mental supremacy in recent years.

    Somehow, that night, Murray beat him down. The image of Lendl, hatchet-faced, looking on, becomes almost a visualisation of the mental strength he brings out in Murray.

    The see-saw emotions, the fragilities, disappear. He becomes that stone man: Murray does not need a tennis lesson, he is one of the best in the world.

    Instead he needs a mentor figure. Murray lacked a psychological edge, and needed someone to help him in the big matches; Lendl is that man.

    He needed someone who could help him prepare better for bigger occasions. He needed Lendl to cut to the heart of what mattered, to be blunt in his assessments.

    Murray was, apparently, at one time concerned about the effect winning a Grand Slam would have on his private life — that it would propel him to a level of fame that would make him uncomfortable.

    Lendl cut through that. He cut through the pressure of British tennis history, cut through the mental exhaustion of chasing the sport's big three.

    Returning last month to find a superior player with a perversely inferior record, he will have cut through the many distractions and interferences that he felt were sapping Murray's energy.

    Sir Steven Redgrave best summed it up. Think back to the Rugby World Cup and Stuart Lancaster's wish for England's players to walk through the Twickenham crowd before matches.

    The RFU loved it, so did the media. Yet what good did it really do the players? They were playing for their country, in a World Cup, at HQ.

    They were stoked already. They knew they were carrying the hopes of a nation. What benefit was there in confronting this, in the flesh?

    Pull up, get out of the bus, get into the dressing-room, win. The people would be happy enough with that. As they are with the regime implemented by Eddie Jones, another coach preaching a complex gospel of simplification.

    Lendl right does not beat around the bush and is blunt in his assessment; he has improved Murray's game. Murray never lost his focus during the tournament and played to his full potential in the final against Raonic.

    At Murray's post-final press conference, he was told a rather lurid story about a fan who came to see him play in Wednesday's quarter-final, having only been released from hospital the day before.

    His pelvis had been crushed by a car accident, and he used up the last of his morphine to make the trip. He returned again for the final. What did it mean to have that support, Murray was asked.

    What would you say to that man in particular? Murray began drily by advising him to get back on the morphine. But what he said next was illuminating.

    Murray felt happy and proud to hear his story and was clearly moved. Murray also withdraws from social media in tournament time.

    One can sense the glare of Lendl, staring down the outside world as these barriers go up, the withdrawal from all that is unnecessary.

    A therapist, then, not just a coach. It was interesting that Murray spoke of his second Wimbledon title being for him, and his team, not for the people.

    Lendl never courted popularity as a player, either. That's Lendl, no monkey business. Stuart Lancaster centre created unnecessary distractions for players when he was England rugby coach.

    Murray was told a heart-warming story at his post-final press conference, but he tries to avoid the pressure.

    There is a story from Lendl's first spell with Murray that encapsulates this drive. He was challenged by Jez Green, then Murray's fitness trainer, to a competition on a cardio workout machine, known as VersaClimber.

    Green was 40 at the time, Lendl I didn't want to kill myself but if I had to I would have done. I was not going to lose.

    That is the irony in the Murray-Lendl relationship. On the surface, he appears to be doing very little. He sits impassively as others in Murray's corner applaud and emote through his matches.

    He barely smiles at a good shot, does not raise an eyebrow at a reverse. This is the great winner? This, the grand motivator?

    This is Lendl the counsellor-coach. He insists he is not staring blankly at the court, but processing the action, deciding what improvements are needed for the next match, over the next month, the next tournament.

    Yet it is also a brilliant psychological ploy. Silence as a calming influence: Silence as a means of control: Silence as a form of trust: I know you can do this, no intervention is required from me.

    It is a significant tactic because it plainly has a positive influence on Murray, who is less given to focus-losing outbursts when Lendl is around.

    Respect is crucial to that, too — and empathy. Lendl trod a similar career path to Murray, losing four finals before going on to win eight Grand Slam titles.

    Murray's goal is to overtake Novak Djokovic to become world No 1; Lendl is the man to help him achieve that. Most importantly, he has won three Grand Slams with Lendl and none without him.

    As a winner of eight Grand Slam titles, having first lost four finals, Lendl travelled a similar career path to Murray.

    He is an authentic voice, but one that also understands Murray's trials. It enables him to speak more harshly at times — the 'home truths' Murray has referred to on numerous occasions.

    The pair do not socialise off court — Murray says they only had dinner twice first time around, and the second of those meetings was the one that ended their professional relationship — but Murray clearly has complete faith in their bond.

    Murray joked that Lendl had got lucky with his second Wimbledon win, and to some extent that is true. Murray didn't have to play Djokovic or Roger Federer at this tournament and given that he was, without doubt, the second best player in the world before Lendl returned it is quite possible he would have won his third Grand Slam no matter the coach.

    Yet that good fortune cannot last and by coming back to Murray's side it is obvious Lendl is preparing for his greatest test: It is so tight in all the matches that one or two points can sway the match.

    Over 20 weeks, Lendl intends to be the one or two points. It's all in the mind. It is believed to be the first time a National Governing Body of an Olympic sport has granted such broad rights to one of its athletes.

    I want to see it grow in the United States. By becoming the promoter of the National Championship I will have a platform to help guide the sport into the future which is really important to me.

    We will continue to look for ways not only for Kayla to stay involved but we will soon announce similar agreements with some of our other athletes.

    It is crucial for USA Judo to continue to support our athletes as they retire and wish to continue to give back to this great Olympic sport.

    The pact also gives Ms. Harrison a sanction for a new event, The Kayla Harrison Cup. Said Harrison "The Kayla Harrison Cup will enable me to create a new event that will be designed to attract the top international stars to compete in the United States on an annual basis.

    The American public doesn't get to see these great athletes very often so I am hoping that an event like this will inspire greater interest in our sport.

    I look forward to developing this new event in conjunction with USA Judo. Support for this ground breaking agreement was felt throughout the sport.

    Having the national championships in her hands immediately raises the bar and gives the event the credibility it deserves. Marti Malloy, Harrison's Olympic teammate and the reigning Olympic bronze medalist, said "I haven't competed in the US Nationals for a few years and I am so excited to take part in the refreshed style of the event that will surely be a huge success with Kayla behind it!

    The National Championship, where Harrison won her 9th national title, took place in April in Dallas. Harrison's debut as promoter of the event will be in when the event moves to November to better fit with the international judo schedule.

    For more information contact Jerry Solomon at StarGames. When Harrison won gold at the London Olympic Games, she became the first American judoka of either gender to become Olympic champion.

    In , Harrison became only the fourth American to win a world title; she is the Pan American Games champion and the 1 judoka in the world in her division.

    She has eight individual Senior National Championships spread over three weight divisions. Harrison will set her sights on defending her Olympic title in Rio on August 11, He won three titles in succession, from to , and reached the final every year from to — a run of eight championship matches in a row that is tied with Bill Tilden for the most by any player, man or woman, in U.

    Moreover, Lendl reached the US Open semifinals in and the quarterfinals on three other occasions, finishing his career with 73 match victories fifth all-time among men and an.

    What was it about coming to New York that brought out your best tennis? I got to stay at my home in Greenwich in southern Connecticut , so that was really nice.

    I think you save a lot of mental energy doing that. You always made sure your practice court and the US Open courts were very similar? It was not very similar, it was totally identical.

    The same crew which resurfaced center court then Louis Armstrong Stadium came to my house the next day and resurfaced my court.

    The amount of sand on the top layer determines the speed of the court, and who has a better feel for that than the crew who did it just yesterday?

    Of your three US Open titles, is there one that stands out as the most memorable or most special to you?

    And of the five title match losses, is there one that stings more than the others? Who was your toughest opponent at the US Open?

    Connors was very tough early on, but you named it, they have moved through the 80s, from Connors and McEnroe to Wilander and Becker. I played Edberg a couple of times at the Open as well, and he was pretty tough, too.

    They were all great players and all very difficult to beat. What will it take for Andy to add a second Open crown in ?

    I think health is one thing. A player must stay healthy, not only so he can compete in the event but so he can prepare for the event properly.

    There is always a little bit of luck involved there. The right draw can have a lot of influence on the outcome of tournaments. Then, just having a consistent year and working well on certain things.

    And as everybody knows, the biggest obstacle for anyone to win a major now is Novak. Speaking of Novak Djokovic, he has reached the semis or better for nine consecutive years at the US Open, and has won four straight Grand Slam tournaments and six of the last eight.

    How do you put into context what he's accomplishing right now? Don Budge did it in and Rod Laver did it twice and , so you have to look at it as something which is probably not that easy.

    Do you think anyone will ever again duplicate that mark? When you look at other sports, there are records and achievements which people think will never be reached, and they are.

    Is somebody going to make 10 straight finals? Is it going to be in the next decade or 70 years from now? Andy worked with Ivan for two years and their successful partnership saw Andy win Olympic Gold in the singles at London , the US Open and the memorable Wimbledon victory in I'm looking forward to Ivan joining the team again and helping me try and reach my goals.

    Ivan Lendl is one of the most decorated players of all time. Winner of 8 Grand Slam tournaments and a 19 time Major Singles finalist, Lendl today welcomed rejoining Murray's team.

    Ivan will work closely with Andy's full-time coach Jamie Delgado and Andy's existing performance team. Harrison made history by becoming the first American judoka to win two gold medals at a world masters event.

    The world masters is an invite-only event for the top judokas in each weight class around the world. Additionally, Harrison secured her world rank as No.

    Stevens, a two-time Olympian in the kg. The invite-only tournament was the final chance to earn points toward the world rankings list, which is the basis for Olympic qualification.

    Ross and Walsh Jennings won their third and fourth gold medals of the Olympic qualifying season, extending their gold medal-winning streak to three consecutive with top finishes in Cincinnati and Moscow.

    The pair are the top-ranked U. The duo defeated Brazil, currently ranked No. Each National Governing Body may nominate one female, one male and one team per discipline.

    An internal nominating committee selects five nominees from both the male and female categories, and three from the team category to advance to the voting round.

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